"Temporality is part of the truth" -- Chuck Klosterman

Thursday, March 29, 2012

My Girl Wants To


I realize this is a strange thing to post after not posting anything for a while (if you missed yesterday's Comeback Post, be sure to check it out), but this song popped up recently on my iPod. I didn't realize I even owned it. Turns out it's on some random collection of 80's super-memorable power-dance hits CD I ended up with somehow, complete with all-time classics from Terence Trent Darby and Will to Power. (Tell me what songs they sing and I'll give you a cookie.)

I'll tell you why I'm writing about this, but first listen to Eddie Murphy's "Party All the Time," especially those of you who've never heard it and have been missing out your whole worthless lives:

So I found myself contemplating what in the H-E-Double Hockey Sticks possesses a comedian at the peak of celebrity to record such a sexy beast of a song. It's as if all along he was paying it forward, giving future comedians fodder ripe and ready for parody.

I mean, without "Party All the Time," we never would have received the bounty that is "Werewolf Bar Mitzvah" from Tracy Jordan (don't try to watch the video; but do listen to the song):

Okay, so my point is that I was listening to Eddie Murphy's quasi-serious-falsetto-croon, wondering if he really sang the vocals, something I've wondered ever since 1985, even though he has since garnered an Academy Award nomination for playing some singer in Dreamgirls (so I do believe he can sing; I just doubted he sang "Party All the Time"; wouldn't you?). And since I lacked wisdom, I reached out to the source we all must rely upon one day: Wikipedia.

Oh, the revelation! Not only did I realize that Eddie did in fact sing the vocals on this single but I was rapturously greeted by the following summary of the song.

Seriously, if you've stuck with me so far, you must read this. I didn't write it. Wikipedia did.
The song tells a harrowing tale from the perspective of a heartbroken lover, portrayed in the first-person by Eddie Murphy. He begins by questioning, perhaps rhetorically, why the female with whom he is currently participating in a relationship would want to cause him emotional pain. The narrator goes on to list extravagant items he's purchased for her, including, but not limited to: Champagne, Roses, and Diamond rings. Despite the items that the narrator has given, the female still insists on staying out all night (presumably in the company of other men). The narrator then poses perhaps another rhetorical question as to what he should do to remedy this depressing situation. The listener is then repeatedly informed that the narrator's "girl" wishes to attend nightclubs and house parties at all hours of the day and night. Later on, the narrator points out that he's acted as a voyeur and observed said female whilst she was present at an unknown nightclub. She was seen providing her telephone number to virtually every male patron of the club with whom she came in verbal contact. We are then informed that the narrator's female companion never arrives at their place of residence in the evening. Her absence is believed to be caused by infidelity, presumably with one or many of the men with whom she became acquainted earlier that evening. The narrator then goes on to wish that his female companion would have sexual intercourse with him, instead of the many other men with whom she has been copulating.

I will never doubt Wikireality again.

But I still don't believe Eddie Murphy really sang "Party All the Time."

12 comments:

  1. I remember Eddie Murphy's song but had never heard Tracy Jordan's. Thanks for the laugh!! You have to wonder if these guys ever take themselves seriously.

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    1. You should watch 30 Rock. If they put out a CD of songs from that show, I'd buy it.

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  2. I remember that song, but never knew (or didn't remember) that it was by Eddie Murphy.

    Now I'm wondering how they got Mr Spock to write that synopsis for Wikipedia?

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    1. It does sound like Spock might have written it. But I think Wikipedia must be its own self-aware entity by now.

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  3. Will to Power? Sure they sang that one song A Cr...Ummm...A Hea... I have no idea.

    I love wikipedia's flat, dry, breakdown of the song lyrics. I wonder how they explain knock knock jokes?

    "The joke begins with a simulated knock at the door, even though there isn't usually an actual door between the two parties involved. At the this point, the recipient of the joke, i.e. the listener, has the option of responding with "Who's there?", although it's quite likely that he's already acquainted with the teller of the joke. Should he respond with "Who's there?", the joke will then proceed..."

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    1. No cookie for you...except your breakdown of the knock knock joke perhaps is worth a cookie.

      Yeah, I've never read another Wikipedia entry with such dry sarcasm. Or any dry sarcasm. Or any sarcasm.

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  4. I wonder what happened to Terrence Trent D'Arby. In any case, I wish him well.

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  5. This entire post has put me in such a giggly mood I don't know how I'm going to concentrate on all the stuff I'm not doing anyway because I'm checking out your blog. Thanks a lot, Dude. :-D

    Some Dark Romantic

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  6. I think Eddie Murphy needed to stick to acting.

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  7. Wow, Mina and Theresa, I must have missed your comments twice. That's terrible of me. It's not like I'm overwhelmed with readers and comments. I should be able to respond to all of these.

    But thanks for visiting and giggling along with me at the silliness of it all.

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